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20121027
20121104
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ge, gm, wal-mart, all that. and then he got small business, but it's the small and growing. it's sickening that were small and can challenge the date and what happens in the big tree falls over. again, the amazing thing is new trees grow right out of the old trees. that is a metaphor, but it's real. because i'm really something big in the economy, it's vital we know how to reconfigure resources and create some new out of it. so do we need control? we need feed back. we need the capabilities to repurpose. in this country, we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have inside of them. that's why people came to this country and that's why people here look for a better future that will be like the better future that their ancestors looked to when they came. so you know, i would say yes, you know, we need control, but we need controls. all kinds of interdependencies, all kinds of self regulations and ways of understanding what's happening, what's working, what's not and what gets us to the endpoint, which is betterment of human lives. it's not gdp. if that i
parts division of gm. you know delco batteries. we had gm that desperate to cut off its own parts and set off delphi as a separate company which immediately pretty quickly went bankrupt. well, down went the vulture's and they pick.delphi corp. out of bankruptcy court for 67 cents, a darned good deal for the entire auto parts division of general motors. 67 cents a share. within two years they flipped it. they went public at $22 a share. share. that is it 3200% prophet that they weren't done. they weren't done. delphi had 29 plans in the u.s. and the delphi group sold it back to gm and the rest, every single plant was sold, was sent off to china. every single uaw job, everyone, 25,200 uaw workers including -- i got a call from michael moore. his dad had the delphi plant and flint michigan. every job sent to china, every one. now that was not the plan. obama's administration came up with the deal with the owner of detroit to take over the delphi unit and basically give it back to general motors. gm, the pistons and the u.s. government would buy back delco auto parts and give it back
in and took a weed wacker and note down the entire field and complete there isn't enough testing for gm crops. >> they did the same thing with the tree fired being used to test for the sequestration of greenhouse gases. they were looking to see if they could increase the absorption greenhouse gases was the breeding of the plant. the environment is it like beckham is to be burned on the grove. >> and so this is obviously a big album for progressives because sites that production may be help global warming but genetic modification, but they're so ideologically -- acts of eco-terrorism. energy production. as you know, the far left seems to be opposed to any and all forms of energy. in the upper left corner after fukushima a few people protesting nuclear power. angela merkel, who i respect us in the iron chancellor of germany, she decided because of the process to shut down nuclear power. now she's a nuclear physicist, so she really should know better. [inaudible] or title with a nylon time. she came into environmentalist pressure and shut down nuclear power plants. in the upper right you're frac
impact these companies, and the idea that you can be at gm or ford for your entire career, people now realize that's not as clear. and so they're more open to other opportunities. now, some of it there's, obviously, different skill sets. some of it is getting the people that do have that creative, innovative spirit to recognize there is an opportunity with some of the companies developing here. even more importantly is how to you get the folks that left detroit to come back here. i'm sure there's thousands, probably tens of thousands of people who that are born and rad here or went to one of the universities in this area who'd love to come back here but really decided to leave because they felt there wasn't a future. that pool of talent, drawing them back, i think, is also a big opportunity. but it really is all about talent. it's an idea plus capital, as josh said. but the most important ingredient is talent. >> you know, one of the things that's also an important ingredient is training and education. i just don't want this section sort of launching our day to get finished without di
? is it possible to create gm in your garage now? mark? >> absolutely.utel so some things that people don't necessarily realize today, thea. cost of a computer numerically-controlled milling machine has come down somethinge on the order of 95% primarily because of moore's law. companies are making the software so much easier to use. we are training people how to use these tools in two or threeg class sessions. now, they're not world class mill rights at the end of two oe three sessions, but if you're patrick buckley and you want to do an ipad case and you come in and take three classes, 90 days later you could have, just like he did, a million dollar company. they did $10 million this year. square did the original threeuae prototypes at tech shop on the benches, so they're doing just fine. so the chasm has just gotten much smaller. typically when you do a software start-up, now you need 25, 50, $75,000. well, now you can do a hardware start-up for the same kind ofsa money.me. we've had dozens and dozens andd dozens of crowd-funded projects come through from $10,000 to $100,000 that actual
can be at gm or ford for your entire career, people now realize that's not as clear. and so they're more open to other opportunities. now, some of it there's, obviously, different skill sets. some of it is getting the people that do have that creative, innovative spirit to recognize there is an opportunity with some of the companies developing here. even more importantly is how to you get the folks that left detroit to come back here. i'm sure there's thousands, probably tens of thousands of people who that are born and rad here or went to one of the universities in this area who'd love to come back here but really decided to leave because they felt there wasn't a future. that pool of talent, drawing them back, i think, is also a big opportunity. but it really is all about talent. it's an idea plus capital, as josh said. but the most important ingredient is talent. >> you know, one of the things that's also an important ingredient is training and education. i just don't want this section sort of launching our day to get finished without dimensioning it. and another community that
consider themselves manufacturers. is it possible to great the gm in your garage now? mark? >> absolutely. so some things people don't necessarily realize today. the cost of a computer numberically controlled is come down something on the order of 95%. we are training how to use the classes. they are not world class at the end of the session. if you are patrick buckley and you want to do an ipad case and take three cases, ninety cays later, you could have like he did a million dollar company. they did $3 in the second year. $10 million year. square did the original three prototypes. they are doing fine. it has gotten smaller. typical when you do a software start-up, now you need $75,000. you can do a hardware start-up for the same kind of money. we had doesn't and dozens of crowd-funded project come through from 10,000 to $100,000 that got them through the prototype stage the first run in manufacturing nap is new to the world. you haven't been able to do that for the kind of price points. den nay all kinds of amazing projects on indy go go to my favorite one rented one is the building --
to become independent. for instance, we can say you can't use vermont land and water for the growth of gm note. we can't prohibit the sale of them in this state because we are still bound by the commerce clause, but we can for him with our land and water from being used for that purpose and we must go ahead and do that. we can prevent the vioxx problems. we don't have to have 100,000 people died because the fda screwed up. we can have our own fda, and what we must do is have an independent investigation of the three buildings that came down in manhattan because it is impossible for three buildings to come down in their own footprint at free full speed unless they are controlled demolition. we have to carry on that investigation in vermont. >> moderator: republican john macgovern your up next. macgovern: thanks for hosting this debate and all the candidates here. i'm running because i believe this is one of the most important elections in our lifetime. this country is clearly on the wrong track. it's on the wrong track because of the people we send to washington. washington has become dysf
off. i just want to see that those bailouts of gm and chrysler benefited nascar because they took all the money the taxpayers gave them and they put it back into nascar because they were still sponsoring it. also, this president does not care about the middle class. we have only had one res on the social security. my mother got a $30 raised, and this is going on for years now. he gets back in we will not get another one. the only reason he gave this one is because of the election. >> host: all right, reid willson. >> guest: with nascar, i will use this opportunity to plug the hot line a little bit if you don't mind. we put up an interesting post last week by two republican named michael shannon and will feltis on the consumer habits and how much they like their sports and which sports the like and how that correlates to the voting data. as you can imagine, nascar is a pretty republican sport but it's interesting to hear that apparently they're getting bailout money. i have not heard that. but check that out. go to hot lineon call.org and see what that says about your politics. >> host
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9